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Full text of "Biennial report of the Industrial Farm Colony for Women, Kinston, N.C"

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BIENNIAL REPORT 

OF THE 

State Industrial Farm Colony 
For Women 

KINSTON 




FOR THE TWO YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1940 



Biennial Report for 1938-39—1939-40 



PERSONNEL 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
(Terms expire June 4, 1942) 

Rev. J. R. Rountree, Chairman Kinston 

Mrs. G. V. Cowper, Secretary-Treasurer Kinston 

Miss Gertrude Weil _■ Goldsboro 

Mrs. Francis D. Winston Windsor 

Ed. W. Summersill Jacksonville 

VISITING STAFF 

Thos. Leslie Lee, M.D., F.A.G.S Medical Director 

Geo. W. Price, D.D.S. : , Dentist 

RESIDENT EXECUTIVE STAFF 

Elsa Ernst Superintendent 

Helen Rollwage Budget Officer and Deputy 



Industrial Farm Colony for Women 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 

To His Excellency, Clyde R. Hoey, Governor, 
and the General Assembly of North Carolina. 

Gentlemen : 

We have the honor of submitting, herewith, the report of 
the State Industrial Farm Colony for Women, for the biennial 
period dating from July 1, 1938, through June 30, 1940. 

On behalf of the board we again wish to set forth for your 
especial consideration the following urgent needs of the 
institution : 

1. Two additional dormitories as a part of a progressive build- 
ing program, which will work towards more adequate care 
for women now housed in jails and who need instead the 
training afforded by the State Farm Colony. 

2. Extra water supply — to provide water supply for above 
dormitories. 

3. New sewage disposal plant — the present plant was pro- 
nounced unsatisfactory in 1935 by State Engineer. 

4. One staff cottage — to provide superintendent with residence. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Rev. J. R. Rountree, Chairman, 
Mrs. G. V. Cowper, Secretary-Treasurer 
of the Board of Directors. 



1 Biennial Report for 1938-39—1939-40 

REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT 

To the Honorable Board of Directors of the 
State Industrial Farm Colony for Women. 

Some years ago, the police matron in a large western city 
of North Carolina wrote us: "We think the change in G. (a 
young woman back on parole from the Colony) is marvelous. 
If the Colony had never done another thing, the work with G. 
alone would be worthwhile. We wish the Colony had at least 
ten buildings instead of two. We could easily keep half a build- 
ing filled ourselves with cases from our city." 

The greatest need of the Colony at the present time is more 
buildings and better facilities for the selection and sending of 
the proper cases to the Colony for training and rehabilitation. 

The Colony has no long waiting list because as has been 
pointed out in previous reports, the jails of the state contain 
our waiting lists. When there is no room for a woman to be 
admitted to the Colony, she is left in jail instead. 

Around two thousand white women are committed to the 
jails of North Carolina every year. After making due allowance 
for a certain number of repeaters, and for those cases which 
are either too low in intelligence, too vicious or depraved, or 
mentally unbalanced, there still remain at a conservative esti- 
mate, every year between eight and nine hundred women 
convicted by the courts, the large majority of whom can be 
reclaimed and returned to society as useful citizens. The Colony 
with its present capacity can train only eighty to one hundred 
of these women per year. The remaining seven to eight hun- 
dred stay in the jails and return to society no better, in many 
cases worse, than when they entered the jails. 

The Colony is therefore urgently requesting two additional 
dormitories to increase its present capacity and provide train- 
ing for a larger number of women than is possible at the 
present time. 

The biennium just completed has seen more women placed 
in well-paying positions after completing their training at the 
Colony, than ever before. More than 50 per cent of the women 
being paroled from the Colony at the present time go out on 
jobs away from their former surroundings. A recent survey was 
made of the progress and earnings of thirty women out on 
parole in four neighboring counties. The general progress and 



Industrial Farm Colony for Women 5 

behavior record of all thirty women were excellent with the 
exception of one whose behavior might be classed as doubtful. 
The aggregate earnings per month of all thirty (including in 
the larger number of cases, room and board) were $1,125.00, 
or an average of $37.50 per woman per month. The following 
two cases are illustrative of many: 

A woman of 35, the mother of ten children, had from 
time to time been brought before the court on immorality 
and other charges, for a period of over five years. When, 
after being finally committed, she came to the Colony, she 
said: "I wish the judge had sent me here five years ago." 
She progressed rapidly under training here, and is now back 
in another community, a changed woman, living a happy and 
useful life, earning an honest living, and benefitting instead 
of hindering those around her. 

Another mother, now earning the equivalent of $35.00 
per month (including her room and board) is giving excellent 
service on her job. She is sending half of her wages every 
month to her mother-in-law in another county for the support 
of her child of school age. 

Thanks to the facilities in our new training building, the 
practical training projects of the institution have been con- 
siderably developed during the past biennium. This is espe- 
cially true of our weaving project. Weaving has a very high 
therapeutic value for many types of problem cases. The satis- 
faction in the creation of beauty and at the same time the 
need for concentration, accuracy, patience, and determination 
in the carrying out of a long continued piece of work, the 
need for close checking on one's work to find and correct 
possible errors, are all invaluable in a character building 
program. Weaving, more than any other type of handwork, 
calls for and develops these qualities in an individual : hence 
the large place given to weaving in our handwork program. 

We wish to draw your attention to the following urgent 
needs of the institution, which are being requested at the 
present time: — 

1. Two additional brick dormitories, to have a capacity of twenty- 
five to thirty inmates each, and to be of fireproof construction 
throughout, according to plans and estimates already submitted, 
as follows: 

One dormitory with heating plant for two buildings $ 72,500 

One dormitory with pipe tunnel and piping between buildings 68,500 



G Biennial Report eor 1938-39 — 1939-40 

Furnishings for above dormitories '_ 15,000 

2. Extra water supply- 

To provide water supply for above dormitories ._. 2,500 

3. New sewage disposal plant 

Present plant pronounced unsatisfactory in 1935 by State 

Engineer '. 15,000 

4. One staff cottage 

To provide Superintendent with residence 3,500 



TOTAL $177,000 

Respectfully submitted, 

Elsa Ernst, Superintendent. 



Industrial Farm Colony for Women 
medical statistics 

For the Two Years Ended June 30, 1939 and 1940 



Admissions per year 

Complete physical examinations of new admissions and returned parolees 

Wassermann examinations of new and returned cases 

Additional Wassermann examinations (rechecks) 

Total Wassermann examinations 

Positive syphilitic cases 

Number of positive carried over from June 30, 1937 

Syphilitic treatments: 

Intra veneous 

Intramuscular 

Total number of syphilitic treatments 

Number of syphilitic cases negative on discharge 

Number of syphilitic cases negative after treatment to June 30, 1940 but still in 

institution 

Number of syphilitic cases still under treatment in institution June 30, 1940 

Gonorrheal examinations cf admissions 

Vaginal smears 

Urethral smears 

Additional gonorrheal examinations (rechecks): 

Vaginal smears _ 

Urethral smears 

Total number cf gonorrheal examinations 

Positive gonorrheal cases 

Number of gonorrheal vaccine treatments, July to November, 1938 

Gonorrheal cases negative after vaccine treatments 

(Treatment changed to sulfanilamide tablets December, 1938) 

Number given sulfanilamide tablets 

Number negative after sulfanilamide treatment ... 

Total number negative cases after treatment 

Number of gonorrheal cases negative on discharge 

Number of gonorrheal cases negative after treatment but still in institution 

Number of gonorrheal cases positive on discharge 

M inor treatments . 

Stool examinations 

Positive hookworm cases 

Hookworm treatments 

Clinical patients 

Regular visits made by doctor 

Average number of patients seen on each visit 

Major operations 

Minor operations 

Hospitalizations (non-surgical cases) 

Average weight on admission 

Average weight on dismissal 

Average weight of hookworm patients on admission 

Average weight of hookworm patients on dismissal (after treatments) 

Typhoid vaccinations 

Smal lpox vaccinations 

Number of smallpox takes 

Infectious diseases .... 

Deceased 



YEARS ENDED 



June 30, 1939 June 30, 1940 



04 
53 
53 
117 

170 
26 
10 

336 
292 
628 



53 

53 
53 

14.") 
143 
196 
20 
67 
12 



1,176 

47 
12 
12 
847 
49 
17 



2 
2 

119 

132 
110 
121 
129 
/i4 
12 



69 
50 
56 
128 
184 
20 



317 
232 

549 

9 



£0 
50 
50 

137 

137 

193 

17 



1,218 
33 



903 

51 

18 

5 

4 

3 

123 

137 

115 

12G 

147 

41 

11 



Biennial Report eor 1938-89—1939-40 



REPORT OF MEDICAL DIRECTOR 

The statistical report above speaks for itself as regards the health of 
the State Farm Colony for the biennium 1938-1940. The report is self- 
explanatory and needs no explanation. 

It will be noted that the treatment of gonorrheal infections was 
changed in December, 1938. During the biennium twenty-five (25) cases 
of gonorrheal infection were treated with sulfanilamide, no other treat- 
ment was given and the results were uniformly good. In every case we 
obtained repeated negative smears. This is important in the institutional 
treatment of gonorrhea because of the cheapness of the drug and the ease 
of administration. No untoward reactions were observed in' any of the cases. 

The sanitary condition of the institution has at all times been very 
good. The water supply is inspected and tested at intervals and at all 
times has been good. 

There have been no outbreaks of infectious diseases. Colds and influenza 
have been at a minimum. This is due no doubt to the early treatment and 
isolation of inmates with such infection, together with the increased resis- 
tance of the women due to improved general health. 

The medical director again wishes to express his sincere appreciation 
of the fine spirit of cooperation exhibited by every member of the staff 
of the institution. 

Thomas Leslie Lee, M.D. 



Industrial Farm Colony for Women 



DENTAL STATISTICS 
For the Two Years Ended June 30, 1939 and 1940 





YEARS ENDED 




June 30. 1939 


June 30, 1940 


Number of admissions for year 


64 
53 
36 
34 

144 

201 
17 

640 
12 
16 

153 
44 
18 
17 


69 




56 


Number showing positive Vincent's infection 


49 
48 


Number of Vincent's tests (rechecks) 

Total number of tests made for Vincent's infection ... . ... ... . _ _ 


80 
174 






Number of Vincent's treatments given 


678 


Number positive, both syphilis and Vincent's infection 

Number of pyorrhea cases.. .... 


9 
13 


Number of cavities of decay. ... . .... 


180 


Number of extractions _____ __ 


21 


Number of patients showing no cavities __ ___. 


7 


Number of partially erupted third molars _ _ ... ___ .. .. 


23 


Number of dental plates made. . 




Total number of clinical patients. _ _ __ 


784 
51 
15 


892 


Total number of visits by dentist _ 


51 


Average number of patients seen each visit 


17 



REPORT OF DENTIST 



All newly admitted women and returned parolees receive a dental 
examination within one week of admission. The percentage of new cases 
positive for Vincent's infection shows a slight increase over the previous 
biennium, that is, seventy-seven per cent for this biennium as against 
seventy-one per cent for last biennium. This, however, is not as large an 
increase as the one during the last biennium over the previous two-year 
period. 

Dental procedures and routines at the Colony are still the same as 
heretofore. A recheck for Vincent's infection is made on every inmate 
every two months. Individual instruction as well as periodic group instruc- 
tion in the care of the teeth and necessary precautions for the prevention 
of infection or re-infection are given. Careful supervision throughout the 
institution following this instruction results in very effective dental care. 

Dental procedures have been greatly facilitated by the addition to our 
equipment of a microscope, dental chair, and cabinet. We are still badly 
in need of a dental engine which would enable us to take care of many 
cavities which we are now unable to care for. 

Geo. W. Price, D.D.S. 



Hi 



Biennial Report for 1938-39—1939-40 



TABLE NO. 1 
GENERAL INFORMATION 



1. Date of Opening April 3, 1929 



2. Plant at June 30, 1940: 

Land 488 acres (100 farmed). 

Buildi ngs 

Equipment 



$ 4,880.00 

129,816.57 
23,187.69 



Total Value % 



157, 



.26 





1938-1939 


1939-1940 


3 . Officers and employees in service at end of year: 


1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 


1 




1 




1 




1 




2 








1 




1 




2 






Total- 


11 


11 







Industrial Farm Colony for Women 



11 



TABLE NO. 2 
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION 





YEARS 


ENDED 


Persons in Institution 


June 30, 1939 


June 30. 1940 


Number in institution, first of year 

Admissions during year: 

Received from courts _ . . . . . . 


44 

46 
3 


47 
51 


Paroled persons returned 


1 










15 


17 






Total admissions to institution ... ... , 


04 


69 








108 


116 






Separations during year: 


48 


48 






Escapes.. _ ..... 






Deaths .... ... .... .... . 




1 


Other dispositions. .... ......... ........ ... _ 


13 


18 






Total separations from institution during year 


61 


67 


Number in institution at end of year 


47 


49 


Average daily resident population during year 

Normal capacity _ _ ... . _ . ... 


46.55 
55 


47.37 
55 






Movement ot Population by Cases 






Total cases, first of year, both in institution and on parole 


207 
46 


188 
51 


Total cases cared for during year 

Number of cases discharged during year 


253 
65 


239 
47 


Total cases with institutional obligation, end of year 


188 


192 


Summary 






In institution, end of year 


47 
141 


49 
143 






Total 


183 


192 







12 



Biennial Report for 1938-39—1939-40 



Revenues and Expenditures 

PERMANENT IMPROVEMENT FUND 

At June 30, 1940 



Revenues: 

Appropriation— Chapter 290 of 1937, Code 1433 
Appropriation— Chapter 1 of 193S, Code 1475 . 

Expenditures: 

Appropriation— 1937 

Appropriation— 1938 

Balance?: 

Appropriation — 1937 

Appropriation — 1938 



Fiscal Year 



I 7,000.00 

9,4)25.00 



16,625.00 



$ 6,814.65 

9,593. S5 



16,408.50 



I 185.35 

31.15 



216.50 



Revenues and Expenditures 

MAINTENANCE FUND 

For the Two Years Ended June 30, 1939 and 1940 



Fiscal Year 
1938-1939 



Fiscal Year 
1939-1940 



Revenues 

Appropriation: 

Chapter 99 of Public Laws of 1937 

Chapter 185 ot Public Laws ot 1939 

Institutional receipts: Sale of tarm products 

Total revenues 

EXPENDITURES 

Adini nistration 

Custodial care 

Operation and maintenance of plant 

Additions and betterments 

Total expenditures 

Balance reverted to general fund 



I 26,100.00 
202.54 



26,302.54 



I 3,9(57.47 
15,099.13 
3,442.29 



* 22, 



3,793.65 $ 



,396.00 
231.36 



26,627.36 



i 3,830.30 

15,121.31 
3,978.44 
1,121.63 

$ 24,051.68 



2,575. 



AVERAGE POPULATION AND MAINTENANCE PER CAPITA COST 
For the Two Years Ended June 30, 1933 and 1940 



Function 


Fiscal Year 
1938-1939 


Fiscal Year 
1939-1940 




S 85.23 

324.36 

73.95 


S 80.86 




319.22 


Operation and maintenance of plant 


83.98 
23.68 






Total 


1 483.54 


$ 507.74 


Average number of inmates 


46.55. 


47.37 



Industrial Farm Colony for Women 



13 



FARM PRODUCTION 





Fiscal Year 
1938-1939 


Fiscal Year 
1939-1940 


FRUITS: 


$ 22.00 


I 25.00 




5.85 




.25 

1.38 

54.75 

22.20 














41.80 








$ 100.58 


$ 72.65 


VEGETABLES: 


$ 236.37 

250.00 

47.25 

1.25 

9.94 

3.00 

73.39 


I 203.25 




260.00 




121.88 




30.40 




17.00 




1.50 




63.00 




3.38 




27.75 

24.00 

75.74 

95.65 

5.45 

5.6. 

34.13 

16.00 

14.50 

5.25 

36.25 

21.25 

11.25 

3.56 

12.00 

7.88 

3.00 

29.67 

20.50 


3.00 




13.88 




54.40 




31.25 








106.31 


Kale 


33.75 




30.50 




27.94 


Okra 


8.44 




70.50 


Peas . . _____ _____ _ _ _ _ _ . 


113.50 


Peppers _ _ _ _ _ ___ _ ________ 


36.63 


Radishes-. _ _ _ ___ _ 


4.88 




13.80 


Squash 


17.50 


Spinach __ __ 


6.50 


Tomatoes __ _ _ ______ 


111.50 


Turnips _ _________ 


4.38 








$ 1,070.68 


$ 1,389.07 


EGGS AND MILK: 

Eggs _ _ _ _ _ 


$ 320.92 
1,938.00 


1 321.33 


Milk 


3,412.75 








$ 2,258.92 


$ 3,735.08 


MEAT: 

Veal 


S 52.80 
285.40 
625.30 
673.20 






$ 276.95 


Fresh pork 


363.15 


Cured pork 


1.203.25 








$ 1,636.70 


S 1,843.35 









u 



Biennial Report for 1938-39—1939-40 
farm production 





Fiscal Year 
1938-1939 


Fiscal Year 
1938-1940 


SHORTENING: 

Butter- ....._... 


S 16.13 


$ 62 . 85 




27.39 




$ 16.13 


1 90.24 


FARM PRODUCT? USED ON FARM: 

Hay. 


$ 360.00 
560.00 


1 440.00 




900.90 




11.90 




5.00 
16.00 
50.00 


18.20 




16.00 


Fertilizer- .. ------- - 


50.00 








1 991.00 


$ 1,437.00 


FARM PRODUCTS SOLD: 

Pigs - 




I 26.61 






3.83 












$ 30.44 








TOTAL PRODUCTION 


$ 6,074.01 


$ 8,597.83 






100.92 










$ 8,698.75 


(82 cords wood cut each year) 







Date Due 




WW! Q % 


wk k 























































































































i — 








BRODART, INC. Cat No 23 233 p 


inted in U S A